We’ve had a lazyish sort of weekend. We went to the gym Saturday morning and Jon ran this morning – but we haven’t accomplished much else.

Dinner last night:

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Recipe for the shrimp can be found here. Recipe for kale chips can be found just about anywhere.

It seemed sort of strange at first because I’ve never had warm/cooked grape tomatoes presented this way. Very good, though. He saved the extra spice mixture for use later since we liked it so much.

Dinner tonight:

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Recipe for the chicken marinade can be found here, but he altered it slightly since we couldn’t find small bottles of apple juice and didn’t want to buy a large one (or maple syrup) for such a small amount. He bought a small bottle of OJ and used that instead. He used red pepper flakes instead of the pepper listed on the recipe, too.

This is the best marinade. Ever. Loved it.

He did a variety since I’m not a fan of bones.

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He steamed the green beans & brussels sprouts (and we eat them plain – no butter/oil). The (boiled in vegetable broth) collard greens were sauteed using an olive oil + vinegar + onion + red pepper combo.

The Egg has been a worthwhile purchase, for sure.

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We’re mostly doing our own things for breakfast and lunch since I eat way more processed stuff (i.e., crackers)/carbs than he does these days (largely because my stomach hurts all. the. effin’. time. and can’t tolerate much fat). I still pack my lunch each day – as I have for years now – and take the same stuff just about every single day: turkey (or some other lean protein) + a salad + a piece of fruit – but weekends are generally unplanned.

Today’s lunch happened because I was starving as we grocery shopped – and freezing – and suddenly had a craving for chili. I bought all the stuff I needed to do it quickly (i.e., no cooking involved) even though I have never been a fan of chili from a can. I didn’t realize the (Amy’s brand) can I bought was vegan (meaning tofu) – but it was good enough. Gave me a good reason to buy a big wedge of cheddar cheese, anyway.

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Jon’s lunch:

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Clams straight from a can.

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He’s nuts.

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So, Belgium.

To get there, we took this general route – through the Rhine River Valley – since we had to exchange cars in Frankfurt:

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It was gorgeous.

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We stopped for lunch at some small town along the way – at the first hotel/restaurant we ran across.

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It was sorta late, so we had the patio to ourselves.

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I chose a vegetable pancake that was full of broccoli, cauliflower & carrots and had some sort of creamy butter sauce on top.

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Jon picked a salad + salmon.

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It was about 70 degrees. Couldn’t have asked for a better way to spend lunch.

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More driving after lunch …

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… but we made it Brugge, Belgium before dark.

We parked in a public garage and had to find our hotel – which took a little while because we hadn’t really planned ahead and done things like look at – or bring – a decent map … but we eventually found it.

View from our room:

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First thing? We walked to a nearby restaurant for a quick dinner.

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Outside again.

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The hotel has a cafe/bar – and we got back from dinner just before they closed – so Jon tried a beer against the advice of the bartender who warned him it might be too disgusting to drink.

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He’d read about it, though, and was determined.

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I had no idea … but here’s what wikipedia says:

Lambic is a very distinctive type of beer brewed traditionally in the Pajottenland region of Belgium (southwest of Brussels) and in Brussels itself at the Cantillon Brewery and museum. Lambic is now mainly consumed after refermentation, resulting in derived beers such as Gueuze or Kriek lambic.[1]

Unlike conventional ales and lagers, which are fermented by carefully cultivated strains of brewer’s yeasts, lambic beer is produced by spontaneous fermentation: it is exposed to the wild yeasts and bacteria that are said to be native to the Senne valley, in which Brussels lies. It is this unusual process which gives the beer its distinctive flavour: dry, vinous, and cidery, usually with a sour aftertaste.

It wasn’t so bad.

Up next: we spent a day exploring Brugge. Which everyone should do, btw. Beautiful.

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